THE BEST OF 2012

A collection of what we at Climate Access consider to be the most useful and thought-provoking climate communication, public engagement, and behavior change resources released in 2012.

 

 

Collection Resources

A national survey from Yale and George Mason University finds that Americans’ belief in the reality of global warming has increased by 13 percentage points over the past two and a half years.

5
A new survey from the Yale Project on Climate Change Communication and the George Mason Center for Climate Change Communication looks at Americans' perceptions of extreme weather events and their perceived relationship to global warming.
5

This guide from the Union of Concerned Scientists provides "do's and don'ts" for addressing personal attacks against scientists, including how to deal with harassing correspondence and how to respond to hostile bloggers.

0

A playbook for U.S. candidates, business and civic leaders who are leading on climate and clean energy solutions.

5

An analysis of the current capacity of the climate science communications field as it relates to the needs of decision makers (by RESOLVE for the Hewlett Foundation and the Packard Foundation).

0

A Yale survey finds that people with high levels of scientific literacy are more culturally polarized. The findings are consistent with the notion that climate change has become highly politicized, but divisions are due to worldviews not merely partisanship.

0

Guidelines for communicating about the connections between extreme weather and climate change to help the public understand how individual events are part of a larger trend.

4.5

A review of the University of Michigan's Erb Institute/Union of Concerned Scientists seminar, "Increasing Public Understanding of Climate Risks and Choices: What We Can Learn from Social Science Research and Practice" that gathered leading climate communications experts.

0