The Climate Access blog is the place for leading climate thinkers and doers to highlight and respond to key developments and findings on climate communications and behavior change. 

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CLIMATE ACCESS BLOG

April 17, 2014
Amy Huva

An update from Minnesota Interfaith Power and Light on how their climate conversations project is going.

April 3, 2014
Ken Eklund

The software system of the future has sprung a space-time leak. But since it’s only in their voicemail storage, it takes them decades to get around to fixing it. Meanwhile, we get to listen to the messages that people leave for each other in the years 2020 to 2065 – by turns banal, mysterious, and terrifying.

March 27, 2014
Mark Trexler

[Reposted with permission from The Climatographers.] 

That fateful line — “we have met the enemy and he is us” — was uttered by Walt Kelly’s cartoon character Pogo some 40 years ago, but in many respects it applies even more today as we try to tackle climate change. The ongoing kerfuffle over an allegedly NASA-funded study suggesting that civilization is headed for an “irreversible collapse” is a narrow but good example of what Pogo was talking about. (You can follow the links below for more information, or you can watch a 6 minute video version of this blog here that shows you all the key pieces of the puzzle).

March 21, 2014
Cara Pike

This was an exciting week for the Climate Access team as we passed the 2,000 member mark when Toby Thaler of the Model Forest Policy Program joined the diverse network of nonprofit, government, and academic leaders from 43 countries working together to develop effective ways to partner with the public to create and promote solutions to climate disruption.

March 6, 2014
Amy Huva

Living with drought is hard. It’s a natural disaster that is a slow squeeze on your sanity until it feels suffocating.

February 18, 2014
Philip Newell

Climate Change reduces factors that normally put the brakes on drought.

February 14, 2014
Brian Ettling

As a climate leader and communicator working at Crater Lake National Park, every summer I speak about climate change in the evening ranger talks I present.